Webinar: Big Things Come in Very Small Packages, SeaHawk—A New Way of Looking at the Ocean

This webinar will provide an introduction to the SeaHawk/HawkEye CubeSat ocean color mission, show you how to discover, access, and work with SeaHawk data, and walk participants through the process of requesting image scheduling for regions of interest.
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Presenter
Sean Bailey, OB.DAAC
Hosted By
NASA EOSDIS
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Online
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The goal of the SeaHawk mission was to prove a concept—that it is possible to collect scientifically credible ocean color data comparable to that of previous ocean color satellite missions from a 3U (or unit) CubeSat, a small, cube-shaped satellite (also known as a nanosatellite) measuring just 10-centimeters x 10-centimeters x 30-centimeters — and the successful receipt of the first image proved it was. Most current ocean observing satellites cost hundreds of millions of dollars and have a spatial resolution of approximately 1-kilometer. The SeaHawk CubeSat mission cost less than one million dollars and has a 120-meter spatial resolution, revealing details in the patterns of ocean biological processes that can not be seen by the larger ocean color satellite missions.

The SeaHawk mission is a unique public, private and federal partnership between the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW), University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Cloudland Instruments, AAC Clyde Space, and Spaceflight Inc. Funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and NASA/Goddard’s Ocean Color Group Under a Space Act Agreement between UNCW and NASA's Science Mission Directorate. This webinar will provide an introduction to the SeaHawk mission, show you how to discover, access, and work with SeaHawk ocean color data, and walk participants through the process of requesting image scheduling for regions of interest.

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Last Updated
Feb 1, 2022